News and information useful to Cleveland State College of Law students, faculty and staff.

Archive for the ‘Apps/Technology’


Online/Remote Instruction Development & Delivery

graphic of student viewing online classHow to Rev Up Your Remote Instruction, an article by C|M|Law Outreach & Instructional Services Librarian Laura Ray, was published in the September 2022 issue of The Rheumatologist.  The article discusses pedagogical foundations for online/remote instruction as well as numerous considerations and strategies for developing and delivering online/remote instruction.  Article topics include technological support for learners; collaboration with instructional designers, AV technicians and librarians; methods for emphasizing humanization and connection in learner-centered instruction; tips for selecting and creating effective multimedia content; incorporating active learning activities and selected free or low-cost products for engaging learners.  The Rheumatologist is the official monthly news magazine of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).  Prior to coming to C|M|Law in 1989, Ms. Ray was a medical librarian.  She has participated in, contributed to, ACR education and advocacy activities for decades.

Help Yourself, Help A Friend – The CSU Reach Out! App

Reach Out logoCleveland State provides a “one-stop” connection point for campus and community mental health services, including emergency contacts, tips and videos that can provide hope and help. The Reach Out! app is available free for download for iOS and Android.

Inside the app, you’ll see resources organized for helping yourself or helping a friend. The app provides plenty of suicide prevention contacts, resources, and tips, along with general campus and community mental health and wellness resources.

You’ll find the app linked on our Mental Health and Well-Being guide.

This Just in: Breached! Why Data Security Law Fails and How to Improve It

Our lives involve a lot of access to digital information and with that also data breaches. Despite the passage of many data security laws, data breaches are increasing at a record pace. In Breached! Daniel Solove and Woodrow Hartzog, argue that we focus too much on the breach itself. Using many stories about data breaches, Solove and Hartzog show how major breaches could have been prevented or mitigated through a different approach to data security rules. Current law is counterproductive they argue because it penalizes organizations that have suffered a breach but doesn’t address the many other actors that contribute to the problem: software companies that create vulnerable software, device companies that make insecure devices, government policymakers who write regulations that increase security risks, organizations that train people to engage in risky behaviors, and more.

Both Solove and Hartzog are experts in privacy and data security.  Solove has authored a number of books and textbooks on privacy and is the John Marshall Harlan Research Professor of Law at George Washington University School of Law.  He also is the founder of TeachPrivacy, a company that provides privacy and data security training. Hartzog is a Professor of Law and Computer Science at Northeastern University School of Law and the College of Computer and Information Science. His research on privacy, media, and robotics has been published in numerous law reviews and peer-reviewed publications.  He has also been published in many popular and news publications.

For additional information on cybersecurity, check out C|M|LAW’s CENTER FOR CYBERSECURITY AND PRIVACY PROTECTION.

Comment 8: And Just Like That, Everything Got All Meta Pt.2

The ABA Rules of Professional Conduct, Model Rule 1.1 Comment 8 requires, “To maintain the requisite knowledge and skill, a lawyer shall keep abreast of changes in the law and its practice, including the benefits and risks associated with relevant technology.” To that end, we have developed this regular series to develop the competence and skills necessary to responsibly choose and use the best technologies for your educational and professional lives. If you have any questions, concerns, or topics you would like to see discussed, please reach out to e.koltonski@csuohio.edu.

 

Last month we looked at metadata as it exists broadly. If you are unfamiliar with the topic or need a quick refresher, you can find Part 1 here.

Today, we are continuing our conversation by focusing more specifically on what lawyers and legal professionals need to understand about metadata. Over the next three sections we will develop knowledge about when metadata useful, when to delete your metadata, and then a more granular look at metadata during discovery.

 

When is Metadata Useful?

 

All the time. Now moving onto the next section. Just kidding. Though it is pretty much all the time, the context in which it is useful constantly changes. As we stated last time, “Metadata is information about data that makes the data easier to organize, utilize, and understand”. System metadata, which is generated by our devices, helps us organize and later locate our work. Without system metadata it would be near impossible for us to get the file that we need when we need it. A process which we do by using the various file managers available within operating systems. Where System metadata is concerned more with organization, Application metadata is focused on utilization and understanding.

 

Application metadata, which is created by our software, is also incredibly important. One of the better-known instances of application metadata is the ability to track edits in Microsoft Word. Metadata in a Word file allows users to see previous versions, track who made changes, and even find out how much time was spent creating and editing the document. In the legal profession, these data can mean a lot to your workflows and billings. Metadata, importantly, provides more utility to the documents created within applications.

 

But how does metadata allow us to better understand data? Consider a digital photo. During a case, you find an image which may or may not be useful. How do you determine if the image was taken anywhere near the area you are researching? Was it even taken at the right day or time? For that we look at a special form of metadata known as Exchangeable Image File (EXIF) data. The EXIF data may show when and where the picture was taken, the settings of the camera, the model of the camera, who took the picture, and even more. There are, however, two important caveats. First, it is possible on most cameras to control the amount of EXIF data created before a picture is taken. Second, it is possible to delete EXIF data after a picture is taken.

 

Speaking of deleting metadata, now is the time for something completely unexpected: that this two-part blog on metadata will in fact be three parts!

 

Why did I decide to do this? The most important reason is because this blog started to run longer than planned and I want to respect your time by keeping these posts manageable. The other reason is because this will provide us some extra space to really dive into deletion and metadata during discovery. Despite this spontaneous intermission, Part 3 will be available later this month.

Comment 8: A Brief Security Brief for 30 March 2022

The ABA Rules of Professional Conduct, Model Rule 1.1 Comment 8 requires, “To maintain the requisite knowledge and skill, a lawyer shall keep abreast of changes in the law and its practice, including the benefits and risks associated with relevant technology.” To that end, we have developed this regular series to develop the competence and skills necessary to responsibly choose and use the best technologies for your educational and professional lives. If you have any questions, concerns, or topics you would like to see discussed, please reach out to e.koltonski@csuohio.edu.

 

If you use the Chrome browser on any of your personal devices, this blog post is for you. This week there has been a lot of reporting that there are newly discovered exploits on the Chrome browser that will make your device less secure. Whether you use Chrome on Windows or macOS [Yes, Macs can be hacked.], you need to update your Chrome app as soon as possible to help protect your system from potential malicious attacks.

This article from Forbes is likely a bit more technical than you may need, but it gives a good overview of what is happening and, more importantly, explains how to go about updating your Chrome browser. Updating Chrome on your phone is handled differently, but phones tend to put everything for updating in the same place. IT departments at your workplace will take care of updating the computers that they manage.

 

Terminology Check:

exploit: A technique to breach the security of a network or information system in violation of security policy (cisa.gov).

Think of an exploit like having a fence around your yard with a big hole in it. Or finding a loophole in the tax law and using it.

 

Updating your devices, operating system, and apps is something you should strive to do on a regular basis, even if you aren’t weird and do it daily like me.