News and information useful to Cleveland-Marshall College of Law students, faculty and staff.


Food Pantry for Cleveland State Students

Lift Up Vikes is the Resource Center and Food Pantry on Cleveland State’s campus for students. If you are a student, you qualifyperiod! The pantry has fresh fruits and vegetables along with non-perishable and personal care items.

The pantry is located in the Rec Center, Room 168 (216-687-5105). No appointment is needed; just stop in during hours that the Resource Center and Pantry is open with your CSU ID (check the hours on their site). The pantry also accepts donations. Contact them for more information.

First Monday at the U.S. Supreme Court

It’s the first Monday in October, which means the U.S. Supreme Court is back in session. The Court has started its session on the first Monday in October every year since 1917 when a new law went into effect changing the start to one week earlier. Starting this fall, the Supreme Court will allow attorneys to make an uninterrupted statement for two minutes to begin each case. As is true almost every year, a number of important cases will be heard that are sure to be studied in Constitutional Law classes for years to come. Here is a preview of a few of those cases (all links for cases come from SCOTUSBlog):

  • In Ohio and a number of other states it is perfectly legal for an employer to fire someone for being gay. This issue will be considered by the court in Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia (Consolidated with Altitude Express Inc. v. Zarda). While an earlier Supreme Court decision legalizing gay marriage is seen as a watershed moment in the path to LBGTQA+ equality, many feel true equality for all citizens cannot be said to exist until one is protected from workplace and housing discrimination.
  • Department of Homeland Security v. University of California – Case centers around whether President Trump was justified in revoking the Obama-era rule (DACA or Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals colloquially known as “Dreamers”) that shielded from deportation more than 700,000 young immigrants who entered the country illegally as children.
  • New York State Rifle & Pistol Assn. v. City of New York – Can a city restrict gun owners from carrying a handgun in their car? At issue is an unusual New York City ordinance that allowed residents to keep a legal handgun at home but prohibited them from transporting it, even to a second home outside the city.
  • Espinoza v. Montana – Must a state offer grants and scholarships to students in church-related schools if it offers such money to students in other private schools? Two years ago, the court broke new ground by ruling the 1st Amendment’s protection for the “free exercise of religion” forbids discrimination against churches when the government gives grants to private groups. Most states, however, have constitutions that forbid giving tax money to churches. The Montana Supreme Court, citing its constitution, blocked a state scholarship fund from giving money to students attending church-related schools.
  • City of Boise v. Martin – Can cities restrict homeless people from camping or sleeping on sidewalks or in public places? The 9th Circuit Court ruled no if no other indoor sleeping places are available. Now the Supreme Court will decide.

Also Supreme-Court related is our database U.S. Supreme Court Records and Briefs, which contains briefs and related documents from Supreme Court cases between 1832 and 1978. Access to this database is IP-authenticated for users connected to the law school’s computer network; faculty and students can also access the database while off campus by logging in with their CSU ID number and library PIN.

C|M|Law’s Space Law Connection

With the 50th anniversary of the moon landing in the news, it’s a great time to talk about Space Law!

C|M|Law’s Global Space Law Center (GSLC), directed by Professor Mark Sundahl, is dedicated to the study of space law and training next-generation space lawyers. GSLC is the only law school center in the nation focused on the law of outer space. Space law is made up of a variety of international agreements, treaties, conventions, and United Nations General Assembly resolutions as well as rules and regulations of international organizations. These documents address numerous issues such as settling disputes, liability for damages caused by space objects, preserving space and Earth environments, and the use of space-related technologies.

The Law Library has numerous resources available on Space Law, such as The Politics and Perils of Space Exploration and The Handbook of Space LawJournals on the topic include Air and Space Law and Journal of Space Law. There is also a Space Law Research Guide. The McGill Institute of Air and Space Law Publications are available through our HeinOnline subscription, which includes the complete Annals of Air and Space Law along with fifty additional titles.

Ohio Legal Help: The Website for Pro Se Civil Legal Help

In 2015, Ohio’s Task Force on Access to Justice, convened by Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor and comprising members of the courts, legal aid, the Ohio Legal Help Foundation, and the private bar, recommended specific actions to help close the civil justice gap. The sixth recommendation from the Supreme Court’s Access to Justice Task Force Report was to “develop and maintain a statewide website devoted to providing free and accurate legal information to Ohio residents,” which resulted in the development of Ohio Legal Help.

Ohio Legal Help is a nonprofit organization that was founded to help Ohioans access the civil justice system. It provides plain language legal help information, interactive self-help tools, and connections to local legal and community resources that can help people resolve their legal issues. The information on Ohio Legal Help is reviewed by expert private and legal aid lawyers. Users can get self-directed legal information including forms and even lawyer referrals.

Cool Tools Spotlight: Hypothesis

Red word balloon with a white lower-case H, the Hypothesis logo. Looking for another way to organize online research or collaborate with other researchers? Check out Hypothesis, a web annotation tool. Instead of bothering with printing, converting file types, or trying to copy and paste text from websites in order to make your annotations, just use this browser add-on. Hypothesis is an open-source (free!) browser add-on that enables users to annotate webpages and online PDFs directly in their browser. Annotations are saved and can be made private or shared publicly to facilitate discussions. Users can tag notations for easier searching and collaboration. Hypothesis has mainly been used among science researchers, but it can be used by anyone on any website. Website developers can also add the tool to their site.