News and information useful to Cleveland-Marshall College of Law students, faculty and staff.

Archive for the ‘Faculty Teaching & Scholarship’


C|M|Law Students Working to Amend Ohio Psychiatry Patient Laws

Photo of someone holding hand of elderly patient in bedAdjunct Professor David E. Schweighoefer has taught “Psychiatry and the Law” for over a decade at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law.  This year, several of his students are working on an independent study with him and St. Vincent Charity Medical Center with the objective of amending Ohio law concerning the mandatory transfer of patients needing psychiatric care to a licensed inpatient psychiatric unit.  The students are particularly looking at how current law may negatively impact patients who are primarily receiving care for medical, not psychiatric, reasons.  Schweighoefer is chair of Day Ketterer’s Health Care Law Practice Group, and he organized the collaborative project with C|M|Law and St. Vincent.  Students have met with St. Vincent physicians, staff and general counsel, as well as the Ohio Hospital Association Behavioral Health Work Group.  Students will soon meet with Ohio Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services staff and selected Ohio legislators to seek support for drafting legislation to give hospitals the ability to provide the best possible medical care to patients who may also need psychiatric care.

Professor Sterio to Publish Casebook in International Law; Participates in WCPN/90.3 “Talking Foreign Policy” Show

M_STERIO.jpgProfessor and Associate Dean Milena Sterio signed a contract with e-Langdell/CALI to write a casebook in International Law. The casebook will be available, in an electronic format, to all students for free. The expected date of publication is 2020.

In addition, Professor Sterio participated as a panelist in an episode of the “Talking Foreign Policy” radio show on WCPN/90.3. The episode was broadcast on May 28, and it available on demand here; it focused on the prospects of a U.S.-North Korea summit. Professor Sterio is a regular participant of the “Talking Foreign Policy” show, which takes place quarterly on WCPN/90.3.

Space Law Resources at the Law Library

International Space Station orbiting EarthInterested in legal issues that are “out of this world?” (Sorry, couldn’t help it.)

C|M|Law’s Global Space Law Center (GSLC), directed by Professor Mark Sundahl, is dedicated to the study of space law and training next-generation space lawyers. GSLC is the only law school center in the nation focused on the law of outer space. Space law is made up of a variety of international agreements, treaties, conventions, and United Nations General Assembly resolutions as well as rules and regulations of international organizations. These documents address numerous issues such as settling disputes, liability for damages caused by space objects, preserving space and Earth environments, and the use of space-related technologies.

The GSLC offers an online summer class, Space Law: A Global View, covering a range of space-related topics including international treaties, domestic regulations of new space companies, jurisdiction issues, and asteroid mining. The GSLC also contains a Research Council that develops material to influence domestic and international regulations and legislation.

Are you taking the Space Law class this summer? The Law Library has numerous resources available such as The Politics and Perils of Space Exploration and The Handbook of Space Law. Journals on the topic include Air and Space Law and Journal of Space Law. Check out the Library’s Space Law Research Guide. Don’t forget, you can also schedule individual research consultations with a law librarian by contacting research.services@law.csuohio.edu.

Professor Witmer-Rich Publishes Article in American Criminal Law Review

Professor Jonathan Witmer-Rich’s article, “The Heat of Passion and Blameworthy Reasons to be Angry,” (55 Am. Crim. L. Rev. 409 (2018)) has been published in the American Criminal Law Review, the nation’s leading criminal law journal.  The article resolves a long-standing conceptual puzzle in voluntary manslaughter cases, when a defendant kills in the “heat of passion” after being provoked.  For decades courts in provocation cases have struggled to determine which features of a particular defendant are properly relevant when assessing the adequacy of provocation.

The article solves this puzzle by identifying a hidden normative component of the heat of passion doctrine: provocation is not adequate if the reason the defendant became extremely angry is due to some blameworthy belief or attribute of the defendant.  A belief is blameworthy if it contradicts the fundamental values of the political community.

The blameworthiness principle also explains when the heat of passion defense should be denied to some defendants—such as possessive men who kill independent women, or defendants who claim “gay panic” or “trans panic”—while allowed for other defendants in arguably similar circumstances.

Professor Robertson Presents at Conference in Novi Sad, Serbia

Heidi Gorovitz Robertson, C|M|LAW’s Steven W. Percy Distinguished Professor of Law and a dual appointee at the Levin College, recently returned from the International Academic Association of Planning, Law, and Property Rights Annual Meeting, held this year at the University of Novi Sad in the Republic of Serbia. Professor Robertson presented “Cities Seethe: Piloting the Path of Natural Gas Pipeline Permitting”.  In addition, Professor Robertson chaired a panel on cities’ responses to migration in Serbia, Turkey, and Greece.  During her visit, she (with the advance assistance of Associate Dean Milena Sterio) finalized a Memorandum of Understanding between Cleveland State University  and the University of Novi Sad to facilitate cooperation between the two universities and perhaps exchanges of students and faculty.