News and information useful to Cleveland-Marshall College of Law students, faculty and staff.


Cool Tools Spotlight: Hypothesis

Red word balloon with a white lower-case H, the Hypothesis logo. Looking for another way to organize online research or collaborate with other researchers? Check out Hypothesis, a web annotation tool. Instead of bothering with printing, converting file types, or trying to copy and paste text from websites in order to make your annotations, just use this browser add-on. Hypothesis is an open-source (free!) browser add-on that enables users to annotate webpages and online PDFs directly in their browser. Annotations are saved and can be made private or shared publicly to facilitate discussions. Users can tag notations for easier searching and collaboration. Hypothesis has mainly been used among science researchers, but it can be used by anyone on any website. Website developers can also add the tool to their site.

Research Resources for Your Summer Classes & Work

photo of law clerk using laptopThe C|M|Law Library provides a range of research resources that can help you do the best in your summer classes and at work.  You can contact us with research questions in-person during Research Services Hours, or via email or chat.  Our Research Guides provide information on and links to materials, websites, and databases addressing over 60 legal topics.  C|M|Law and CSU students can schedule a Research Consultation for in-depth assistance with topical legal research or when writing an upper-level paper or journal note.  C|M|Law students can also access Law Library Legal Research Seminars, which address major legal databases, terms and connectors searching, Bluebooking, administrative law, Federal legislative history, free web research, bioethics and scholarly writing.  Our Seminars are continuously available on the Westlaw TWEN platform.  If you want to earn points, complete that Seminar’s quiz.  When you earn 100 points, you are awarded a “Law Library Legal Research Letter of Recognition” and a Digital Badge, which you can post to your LinkedIn page.  Seminar points are good for the entire time you are here at C|M|Law, and you can earn multiple Letters of Recognition and Digital Badges.

Updated “Administrative Law” & “Federal Legislative History” Seminars

Image of C|M|Law Library Digital BadgeTwo Seminars have just been updated on the Law Library’s Legal Research Seminars TWEN course.  The updated “Administrative Law” Seminar reflects changes resulting from the Westlaw Edge platform.  The updated “Cost-Effective Federal Legislative History: Congress.gov and Govinfo.gov” Seminar reflects changes resulting from the Govinfo.gov website (which replaced the FDsys website).  We will continue to update and add new Seminars over the summer.  Remember, the Law Library’s Legal Research Seminars are continuously available on the Westlaw TWEN platform.  View a Seminar, then complete that Seminar’s quiz to earn points.  When you earn 100 points, you are awarded a “Law Library Legal Research Letter of Recognition” and a Digital Badge, which you can post to your LinkedIn page.  Seminar points are good for the entire time you are here at C|M|Law, and you can earn multiple Letters of Recognition and Digital Badges.

Updated “Bluebook” Seminar

image of the cover of the bluebook“The Bluebook: Citing to Basic Sources” has just been added to the Law Library’s Legal Research Seminars TWEN course.  This new “Bluebook” Seminar is an updated version of a previous Seminar.  Stay tuned – we will be adding more updated Seminars, and new Seminars, over the next few months.  Remember, the Law Library’s Legal Research Seminars are continuously available on the Westlaw TWEN platform.  View a Seminar, then complete that Seminar’s quiz to earn points.  When you earn 100 points, you are awarded a “Law Library Legal Research Letter of Recognition” and a Digital Badge, which you can post to your LinkedIn page.  Seminar points are good for the entire time you are here at C|M|Law, and you can earn multiple Letters of Recognition and Digital Badges.

Tips for Locating FOIA Responses Online

image of file foders with a magnifying glass The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) recognizes the public right to access government information and enables the public to submit requests to federal government agencies for information that has not otherwise been made publicly available already. Agencies are required to disclose the information in response, unless it falls under one of the nine exemptions, covering information related to national security, law enforcement, and more.

Where else can researchers find FOIA responses? A recent article in the College and Research Libraries Newsletter highlights several electronic reading rooms, government, and non-government websites. For example, the CIA and the EPA are among the agencies with their own agency-specific FOIA archive online. Other governmental websites that are helpful in FOIA research are presidential libraries, data.gov, and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA).