News and information useful to Cleveland-Marshall College of Law students, faculty and staff.

Archive for the ‘Ohio’


New Legal Research Seminar Added to TWEN

 A new seminar was just added to the Law Library’s collection of Legal Research Seminars on TWEN. This new seminar focuses on Administrative Law. Information on the rulemaking process, official sources, and helpful research tips are included for both Federal and Ohio administrative law. The Administrative Law Seminar is worth 25 points, which you can earn by correctly answering 75% of the questions on the quiz. Remember, points roll over from year to year, and 100 points will earn a Law Library Legal Research Seminar Letter of Recognition, as well as a Digital Badge that can be posted on your LinkedIn page.

 

Check out the other Legal Research Seminars on the TWEN page, including:

  • Starting Research with Secondary Sources (17:02 mins; 12.5 points)
  • Bluebooking (38:47 mins; 25 points)
  • Terms & Connectors Searching (10:48 mins; 12.5 points)
  • Lexis Advance Overview (21:11 mins; 12.5 points)
  • Shepard’s (11:54 mins; 12.5 points)
  • Westlaw Overview (20:03 mins; 12.5 points)
  • KeyCite (10:16 mins; 12.5 points)
  • Bioethics Research & Scholarly Writing (28:33 mins; 25 points)

Law Library Legal Research Seminars are for C|M|Law students, including our MLS and LLM students.  For additional information, contact Laura Ray, Outreach & Instructional Services Librarian, 216-687-6880, l.ray@csuohio.edu.

Law Library Legal Research Seminars & Digital Badges

The Law Library has two upcoming live Legal Research Seminars particularly important for students who plan to work this summer.  Remember, each C|M|LAW student who earns 100 Legal Research Seminar points receives a Legal Research Seminar Letter of Recognition, as well as a Digital Badge that you can post to your LinkedIn page.

The Ohio Legal Research Crash Course is Thursday, March 29th, and Getting Ready to Clerk is Thursday, April 5th.  Each Seminar is 4:50pm-5:50pm, in Law Library Room A059, and light refreshments will be provided.  In the Ohio Legal Research Crash Course, we’ll examine key Ohio research resources, and discuss effective strategies and best practices for their use.  In the Getting Ready to Clerk Seminar, legal practitioners will talk with you about research projects done by clerks and new associates – how projects are assigned, typical projects, and feedback to expect.  Each of these Seminars is worth 25 points.

The Law Library also has eight online Legal Research Seminars, available on the Westlaw TWEN platform, that students can “attend” at their convenience:

  • Starting Research with Secondary Sources (17:02 mins; 12.5 points)
  • Bluebooking (38:47 mins; 25 points)
  • Terms & Connectors Searching (10:48 mins; 12.5 points)
  • Lexis Advance Overview (21:11 mins; 12.5 points)
  • Shepard’s (11:54 mins; 12.5 points)
  • Westlaw Overview (20:03 mins; 12.5 points)
  • KeyCite (10:16 mins; 12.5 points)
  • Bioethics Research & Scholarly Writing (28:33 mins; 25 points)

Your Seminar points are good for the entire time you are here at C|M|LAW, and you can earn multiple Letters of Recognition and Digital Badges.  Questions?  Contact Laura Ray, Outreach & Instructional Services Librarian, 216-687-6880, l.ray@csuohio.edu.

Online Access to State Legal Information

map of 50 US statesFollowing up on last week’s post about Sunshine Week, which focuses on freedom of information and government transparency, it is also important to highlight public access to state law. The Digital Access to Legal Information Committee of the American Association of Law Libraries maintains detailed tables of State Online Legal Information. The tables provide information about free online access to the essentials of state law: court opinions, session laws and statutes, and administrative registers and codes. For researchers relying on this access, it is important for them to know whether the online versions of these legal materials are official, authenticated, have guaranteed continued availability, and will be preserved. Each state, including the District of Columbia, has its own table. Check out Ohio.

Sunshine Week 2018: Examining Open Government

March 11-17 2018 is Sunshine Week, the annual nationwide celebration highlighting the importance of freedom of information and government transparency. Sunshine Week has been recognized annually since 2005 by the American Society of News Editors (ASNE) and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press. These organizations are joined by news media, government officials, academic institutions, libraries, and all people interested in open government. The broad goals are to empower the public to get involved in all levels of government, to boost public access to government information, and to use that access and information to strengthen communities and individuals.

Sunshine Week is a good time to check on our government officials’ efforts at supporting governmental transparency. According to AP News, the current administration has set a new record for censoring and withholding government information more often than at any other time over the last decade. The Associated Press analyzed data on Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) compliance, covering eight months under the current President. The analysis revealed that the federal government provided censored files or nothing at all in 78% of the 823,222 requests made during that time, and the government spent a record $40.6 million defending those decisions to censor and withhold.

For information on Ohio’s Sunshine Laws see:

Ohio Open Government Laws 

Ohio Attorney General: “Ohio Sunshine Laws: An Open Government Resource Manual” (Yellow Book 2018) 

Ohio Coalition for Open Government

States Acting on Net Neutrality

 Net neutrality is the concept that your Internet Service Provider (ISP) should not be controlling what you have access to on the internet. Since ISPs control their customers’ connections to the internet, they are in the position to block sites, redirect users to different sites, or cause some sites and services to load slowly and run badly. Net neutrality has been in the news during the past few months as the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has rolled back net neutrality rules that it had issued in 2015. The final rule, published on February 22 in the Federal Register, eliminates conduct rules imposed by the 2015 rules, and merely requires certain disclosures from ISPs about their services and practices. For more on the history of net neutrality, check out this timeline.

In response to the repeal of net neutrality, states have been taking up the issue. The National Conference of State Legislatures provides a summary and table of state action on net neutrality. In five states, governors have issued executive orders to protect net neutrality. Washington has become the first state to enact net neutrality legislation, while legislation has been proposed in 26 states. In the Ohio Legislature, House Concurrent Resolution 18, Continue Net Neutrality and Open Access, was introduced on December 4, 2017. The resolution recognizes the necessity of high-speed internet services, the importance of equitable access to those services, and the protections that had been mandated by the 2015 rules. The resolution declares Ohio’s support of net neutrality, and calls on the President and Congress to protect open internet access. For more on net neutrality, check out C|M|Law Professor Brian Ray discussing net neutrality on ideastream’s The Sound of Ideas, original air date December 18, 2017.