News and information useful to Cleveland-Marshall College of Law students, faculty and staff.


Law Library Legal Research Seminars – Social Justice Track

Image of C|M|Law Library Digital BadgeC|M|Law students interested in cost-effective research or social justice research issues should check out these four Law Library Legal Research Seminars:

  • Starting Research with Secondary Sources
  • Terms & Connectors Searching
  • Cost-Effective Searching on Lexis Advance & Westlaw
  • Cost-Effective Federal Legislative History: Congress.gov and Govinfo.gov

Law Library Legal Research Seminars are for C|M|LAW students, including our MLS and LLM students, and are continuously available online via the Westlaw TWEN platform.  [Connect to TWEN, then “add” the C|M|Law Library Legal Research Seminars course.]  You earn points for completing an online Seminar by correctly answering 3/4 of the questions on that Seminar’s quiz.  Your Seminar points are good for the entire time you are here at C|M|LAW.  When you earn 100 points, you are awarded a Law Library Legal Research Letter of Recognition and a Digital Badge, which you can post to your LinkedIn page.  You can earn multiple Letters and Digital Badges.  For more information on the Law Library Legal Research Seminars, contact Laura Ray, Outreach & Instructional Services Librarian.

Law Library Legal Research Seminars – Earn Your Digital Badge!

digital logo featuring three point shield and lady justiceLaw Library Legal Research Seminars cover Westlaw, Lexis Advance and Bloomberg Law, as well as many topical legal research areas such as administrative law.  Several Seminars emphasize cost-effective research or include a social justice research issue.  Law Library Legal Research Seminars are for C|M|LAW students, including our MLS and LLM students, and are continuously available online via the Westlaw TWEN platform.  You earn points for completing an online Seminar by correctly answering 3/4 of the questions on that Seminar’s quiz.  Your Seminar points are good for the entire time you are here at C|M|LAW.  When you earn 100 points, you are awarded a Law Library Legal Research Letter of Recognition and a Digital Badge, which you can post to your LinkedIn page.  You can earn multiple Letters and Digital Badges.  Here are the currently available online Law Library Legal Research Seminars:

  • The Bluebook: Citing to Basic Sources
  • Starting Research with Secondary Sources**
  • Terms & Connectors Searching**
  • Cost-Effective Searching on Lexis Advance & Westlaw**
  • Lexis Overview
  • Shepard’s
  • Westlaw Overview
  • KeyCite
  • Practical Law from Westlaw
  • Bloomberg Law Overview
  • Administrative Law
  • Cost-Effective Federal Legislative History: Congress.gov and Govinfo.gov**
  • Researching Foreign Law
  • Tax Law Research
  • Health Law & Bioethics Resources & Scholarly Writing
  • HeinOnline
  • Scholar Catalog

** Social Justice track Seminar.  For more information on the Law Library Legal Research Seminars, contact Laura Ray, Outreach & Instructional Services Librarian.

Survey of Legal Research Learning Outcomes and Assessment Plans

Survey Results Pie ChartC|M|Law Outreach & Instructional Services Librarian Laura Ray recently presented a poster at the 2019 American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting on “Legal Research Learning Outcomes and Assessment Plans: A Survey of Current Developments and Methods for Law Librarian Engagement.”  Laura worked with Stacy Etheredge, University of Idaho Law Library Associate Director, in a review of the websites of 84 law schools in 29 states and the District of Columbia.  [Ohio law schools were not included.]  The poster presented a composite summary of readily available law school learning outcomes* and assessment plans** related to legal research.  Only 11 law schools (13.1%) had well developed legal research learning outcomes, and 45 law schools (53.6%) had a simple statement of such learning outcomes.  The poster also presented sample mappings of legal research learning outcomes to law school curricula, performance criteria and measurement instruments for such learning outcomes, and suggested methods for law librarians to engage in the development of such learning outcomes and assessment plans.  In the coming year, Laura and Stacy plan to continue their survey by reviewing the websites of the remaining 112 law schools, as well as contacting law schools not providing information on their websites.

*Standard 302(b) of the American Bar Association (ABA) Standards and Rules of Procedure for Approval of Law Schools specifies one of the four minimum learning outcomes to be competency in “legal analysis and reasoning, legal research, problem-solving, and written and oral communication in the legal context.”  **Standard 315 specifies conducting “ongoing evaluation of the law school’s program of legal education, learning outcomes, and assessment methods … to determine the degree of student attainment of competency in the learning outcomes and to make appropriate changes to improve the curriculum.”  Standards 302 and 315 were revised and became legally effective at the end of the ABA Annual Meeting on August 12, 2014, but the ABA did not require the application of these Standards until the 2016-2017 academic year. [See Transition to and Implementation of the New Standards and Rules of Procedure for Approval of Law Schools August 13, 2014.]

Searching Ohio Bills and the Ohio General Assembly Archives

While searching for Ohio Bills on the legislature’s website recently, I noticed that only the current and previous two legislative sessions (133, 132, 131) can be searched. This seemed strange, because previously the site could be searched back to the late 1990s. I discovered that archival searches from 1997-2014 are still available, but must be searched through the Ohio General Assembly Archives.

Both websites have the same search features and can be searched by keyword, bill number, and sponsor. The only difference seems to be that all legislation dealing with particular subjects can be pulled up in the current bills search. The work-around in the archive search is to experiment with different keywords searches.

Special Focus Collections on LLMC Digital

LLMC Digital is a is a non-profit cooperative of libraries dedicated to the twin goals of preserving legal titles and government documents while making copies inexpensively available digitally through its online service.

The LLMC Digital Special Focus Collections has tons of interesting and unique information grouped into twenty databases. Doing research on Ancient Roman Law? There are almost forty treatises available on that topic. Other notable databases in the collection include the Yale Blackstone Collection, Islamic Law, Canon Law, and the Native American Collection.

The above links to LLMC Digital can also be found in our list of law databases.