News and information useful to Cleveland-Marshall College of Law students, faculty and staff.


IT and Law Library Orientation Now Open for 1Ls

In conjunction with C|M|Law’s Jump Start program for students starting school in the fall, the Information Technology department and law library are offering orientation materials on a drop-in basis.

How it works:

  1. Come by the research services office (Room 112) across from the circulation desk during normal hours.
  2. You will meet and talk with one of our librarians, who will give you a scavenger hunt handout and IT information for your law school computer accounts. The scavenger hunt takes 20-30 minutes and will help you get orientated to the law library and IT services.
  3. Upon completion of the scavenger hunt, give your results to a librarian in Room 112, at which point you will be given registration information for Lexis, Westlaw, CALI, and Scholar along with information on our legal research seminars and digital badge program.
  4. All students who complete the scavenger hunt will be entered into a contest for a $50 Amazon gift card; the drawing will be held during the first full week of classes.

Law Library Legal Research Seminars – Always Available for You!

Law Library Legal Research Seminars are for C|M|LAW students, including our MLS and LLM students.  The Seminars are continuously available online via the Westlaw TWEN platform.  You earn points for completing an online Seminar by correctly answering 3/4 of the questions on that Seminar’s quiz.  Your Seminar points are good for the entire time you are here at C|M|LAW.  When you earn 100 points, you are awarded a Law Library Legal Research Letter of Recognition and a Digital Badge, which you can post to your LinkedIn page.  You can earn multiple Letters and Digital Badges.  Here are the currently available online Law Library Legal Research Seminars:

  • Starting Research with Secondary Sources – Why recreate the wheel? Examine how secondary sources explain and analyze “the law” for you, as well as cite primary authority. [17:02 mins; 12.5 points]
  • Westlaw Overview – [10:48 mins; 12.5 points] – Leap beyond Google and start to harness this legal research gtiant. Understand big box and pre-filtered searching, as well as how to print/download/email search results.
  • KeyCite – [10:16 mins; 12.5 points] – Why is a red flag different from a yellow flag, and what should you do when you see either one? Learn how to use the Westlaw citator service to update and expand your research.
  • Lexis Advance Overview – [21:11 mins; 12.5 points] – One more time, leap beyond Google and start to harness this legal research gtiant. Understand big box and pre-filtered searching, as well as how to print/download/email search results.
  • Shepard’s – [11:54 mins; 12.5 points] – Why is a red stop sign different from a yellow triangle, and what should you do when you see either one? Learn how to use the Lexis Advance citator service to update and expand your research.
  • Terms & Connectors Searching – Explore the power of search techniques beyond natural language searching. Learn the basics of combining terms & phrases in effective search statements. [10:48 mins; 12.5 points]
  • Bluebooking – For faster legal drafting, review how to effectively apply citation and style rules, as well as abbreviation and jurisdiction tables. [38:47 mins; 25 points]
  • Administrative Law – [29:59 mins; 25 points] Break through the mysteries of agency rulemaking and case adjudication. Learn the key resources for finding federal and Ohio agency regulations and decisions.
  • Bioethics Resources & Scholarly Writing – Examine a wide array of bioethics resources, and learn how these resources can be used to select a paper topic and conduct effective research on that topic. [28:33 mins; 25 points]

For more information on the Law Library Legal Research Seminars, contact Laura Ray, Outreach & Instructional Services Librarian.

Space Law Resources at the Law Library

International Space Station orbiting EarthInterested in legal issues that are “out of this world?” (Sorry, couldn’t help it.)

C|M|Law’s Global Space Law Center (GSLC), directed by Professor Mark Sundahl, is dedicated to the study of space law and training next-generation space lawyers. GSLC is the only law school center in the nation focused on the law of outer space. Space law is made up of a variety of international agreements, treaties, conventions, and United Nations General Assembly resolutions as well as rules and regulations of international organizations. These documents address numerous issues such as settling disputes, liability for damages caused by space objects, preserving space and Earth environments, and the use of space-related technologies.

The GSLC offers an online summer class, Space Law: A Global View, covering a range of space-related topics including international treaties, domestic regulations of new space companies, jurisdiction issues, and asteroid mining. The GSLC also contains a Research Council that develops material to influence domestic and international regulations and legislation.

Are you taking the Space Law class this summer? The Law Library has numerous resources available such as The Politics and Perils of Space Exploration and The Handbook of Space Law. Journals on the topic include Air and Space Law and Journal of Space Law. Check out the Library’s Space Law Research Guide. Don’t forget, you can also schedule individual research consultations with a law librarian by contacting research.services@law.csuohio.edu.

Tech News: More on AI in Legal Research

drawing of human brain, half circuitboard and half artistic swirlsCasetext, a free online legal research platform known for its subscription-based artificial intelligence (A.I.) research tool called CARA, has launched an updated and enhanced version. The updated version, known as CARA A.I., does not just analyze citations anymore. It is now a robust legal research engine. New features include seamless integration of CARA A.I. with Casetext research. Additionally, users can upload litigation documents containing no citations to CARA A.I., and the program will analyze the documents and generate a list of authority based on the issues, facts, and jurisdiction present.

For more about AI in legal research, Thomson Reuters has this breakdown, and has teamed up with Above the Law to produce Law2020,  a series on AI in the legal field.

Machine Learning and AI have many applications beyond the law. For a humorous take, check out SkyKnit and the full Aiweirdness.com archive.

US Supreme Court Records and Briefs Database

Faculty and students at Cleveland-Marshall have access to Gale’s U.S. Supreme Court Records and Briefs database. This database contains briefs and related documents from Supreme Court cases between 1832 and 1978. Previously, many of these briefs were not available through any of the library’s other legal databases, so this is a very useful for anyone doing research on older Supreme Court cases.

Access to this database is IP-authenticated for users connected to the law school’s computer network; faculty and students can also access the database while off campus by logging in with their CSU ID number and library PIN.