News and information useful to Cleveland-Marshall College of Law students, faculty and staff.


Veterans Services at CSU and Beyond

Cleveland State has its own Veterans Student Success Program with offices located at 2254 Euclid Avenue, Trinity Commons, Cleveland OH 44115.  The can also be reached by phone at 216-875-9996 or email at vikingvets@csuohio.edu

Veterans Services at CSU –one stop shopping with links to all services available for vets at CSU.

Veterans Benefits and Financial Aid –GI Bill information, financial aid and scholarships.

Counseling and other Mental Health Services:

Cleveland State Counseling Center – Academic, career, and personal counseling.  To find out more about the services offered by the Counseling Center please stop by (UN 220) or call them at 216-687-2277.  You may also stop by or call to set up a phone screening with a counselor.  The phone screening is designed to help determine what services are best for you.  At the end of the screening, the therapist will offer you a list of options tailored to your needs.  Common options include individual counseling at the counseling center, referral to counseling in the community, group counseling, workshops, and/or referrals to CSU and non-CSU resources.  Walk-in sessions are available from 1pm-3pm Monday through Friday.

Cleveland Veterans Administration Services—outpatient counseling available.  Contact the local VA for help on getting access to medical care for vets.

Check Out Our Pinterest Boards

Are you looking for tips for interviewing and writing your resume? Or maybe you are wondering what to wear to the office for your new internship. Check out the Law Library’s Pinterest boards.

We also have boards highlighting new books and movies available in our collection, and a board about things to do and see around Cleveland.

Stressed out? Try some of the exercises, breathing techniques, and healthy recipes on our Work-Life Balance board.

Bar Exam Tip: Keep Breathing

Image of e-reader displaying words "Don't Panic" The bar exam is next week and you have been studying hard all summer, well actually for your entire law school career. With all the studying and pressure, it’s still important to be aware of and to manage your stress level. Most people experience some nervousness when faced with a big exam, but for some, those nerves can be overwhelming.

If you are having feelings of dread, and physical symptoms such as a racing heartbeat, nausea, shortness of breath, sweating and dizziness, then you may be experiencing a more serious form of stress called test anxiety. For people with test anxiety, the mind sees an exam as a threat and that triggers the body to produce the hormones and physical reactions usually seen when your “fight or flight” response activates. Don’t worry, there are many strategies you can practice to help reduce these effects. For example, while studying make sure you are still getting plenty of rest, staying hydrated, and taking breaks. You can also find a few breathing and meditation techniques that help calm your mind. Those breathing techniques will be useful during the exam.

Breathing exercises are actually beneficial for everyone. Regardless of your stress level, the bar exam is lengthy and you may find yourself becoming fatigued, or freezing on a question. It’s important not to panic when that happens, and take a few deep breaths instead. This will help slow everything down and reset yourself. It won’t take up much time, and may actually save you time in the long run by helping you unfreeze and move on. You can try the 4-7-8 Breathing Exercise, or some Belly Breathing. Use your lunch break to walk around and try some stretches to release the tension from your neck, shoulders, and back.

Check out our Work-Life Balance Pinterest board for more tips on stress management, easy and healthy meals, and short exercise routines that fit into your busy schedule.

Good luck! You’ve got this!

Law Related Fiction, Movies and Documentaries Available for Checkout

Did you know the Law Library now has law related books, movies, and documentaries?  They are located on the 1st floor to the left of the entrance (when entering the library) by the reference section.  With the semester winding down it may be time to start thinking of things for your holiday break.  The videos can be checked out for a week but can be renewed online so if you are not nearby—no problem.

Also, don’t forget you can get plenty of other fiction through the law library’s catalog (Scholar), OhioLINK, and SearchOhio.  For those unfamiliar with SearchOhio, think of it as the public library’s version of OhioLINK. By sharing resources, OhioLINK members now have access to an additional 9.5 million popular materials, and SearchOhio members have access to the circulating collection of OhioLINK. If an item you want is not available by searching the OhioLINK catalog, you may check the SearchOhio collection by clicking the “SearchOhio” icon in the upper right hand of the screen. Enter your ID and password just as you would when requesting OhioLINK materials, and the material will arrive in the same manner as any OhioLINK book would arrive. Fine policies differ somewhat. Just ask a library staff member for details.

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This Just In: The Anxious Lawyer

anxiousPracticing law can be fraught with stress, uncertainty, self-doubt, and anxiety. Meditation and other mindfulness practices can lead to a more balanced life, and ultimately to a more joyful career in law. The Anxious Lawyer: An 8-Week Guide to a Joyful and Satisfying Law Practice Through Mindfulness and Meditation by Jeena Cho and Karen Gifford [Find It] is a uniquely law-focused introduction to meditation. Even if you’ve tried meditation before, this book might help you work through those rough patches of your law (or law school) career.