News and information useful to Cleveland-Marshall College of Law students, faculty and staff.


Law & Gender, Journals & Databases

If you’re writing a seminar paper, independent study requirement, or note on a gender-related topic, we have plenty of resources for you. Secondary sources like journal articles are a great way to start your research, see what has and hasn’t been written, and get ideas for your own paper. Here is a list of some of the law and gender journals available to you. Check  Scholar, the library catalog, to find out how to access each journal.

  • Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law and Justice
  • Cardozo Journal of Law & Gender
  • Columbia Journal of Gender and Law
  • Duke Journal of Gender, Law and Policy
  • Gender Issues
  • Harvard Journal of Law and Gender (formerly Harvard Women’s Law Journal)
  • Journal of Gender, Social Policy and the Law (formerly American University Journal of Gender and the Law)
  • Michigan Journal of Gender and Law
  • The Georgetown Journal of Gender and the Law
  • Yale Journal of Law and Feminism

Law and gender topics lend themselves to interdisciplinary research, so don’t limit yourself to the familiar law databases. The Michael Schwarz Library lists several core databases for women’s studies:

  • Gender Studies Database
  • GenderWatch
  • LGBT Life with Full Text
  • Viva Database
  • Women’s Studies International

Legal History “Cohen” Essay Competition

image of Morris CohenThe Legal History and Rare Books Special Interest Section (LHRB) of the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL), in cooperation with Gale Learning and Research Solutions, Cengage Learning, is conducting its Annual Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Competition.  Full- and part-time students currently enrolled in accredited graduate programs in law, history, library science or related fields are eligible to enter.  Essays may be on any topic related to legal history, rare law books, or legal archives.  Criteria on which papers will be judged include originality of topic or approach, quality and depth of research and analysis, clarity of presentation, and contribution to the field.  The winner will receive a $500 prize from Gale Cengage Learning and up to $1,000 for costs of attending the July 2017 AALL Annual Meeting in Chicago, as well as the opportunity to present the winning essay at the AALL Annual Meeting.  Authors of the winning and runner-up essays will also be invited to publish their essays in LHRB’s online scholarly journal  Unbound:  An Annual Review of Legal History and Rare Books.  The Competition electronic submission deadline is 11:59pm EDT, Monday, 17 April 2017.

Full Competition details and Application Form are available at the LHRB SIS Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Competition web page.  Questions can be sent to Fred Dingledy (fwding@wm.edu), Senior Reference Librarian, College of William & Mary Law School, or Tim Kearley (TKearley@uwyo.edu), Professor Emeritus of Law, University of Wyoming College of Law.

The Competition is named for Morris L. Cohen, who was Professor Emeritus of Law at Yale Law School and recognized as “one of the towering figures of late 20th century law libraries.”  His scholarly work  focused on legal research, rare books, and historical bibliography.

Sam Sheppard Case Still Captures the Imagination

shepshep2The Sam Sheppard Case Collections of materials from 1954-2000 is a very popular online collection from C|M|Law. Since July 1, 2014, 37,546 documents have been downloaded. People from all 50 states plus the District of Columbia accessed the website. Also, people from 133 countries accessed the website. In addition to various crime scene photos, the most downloaded document is Marilyn Sheppard’s autopsy report which was downloaded 2,300 times.  Kudos to C|M|Law Library’s Technical Services for their continuing hard work in making this collection accessible.

Background on the cases and the collection:

In the early morning hours of July 4, 1954, Marilyn Sheppard was bludgeoned to death in her bed. Her husband Sam, a prominent Bay Village doctor, maintained that Marilyn was murdered by a bushy-haired intruder. He stood trial and was convicted for his wife’s murder amidst a media storm.

The media frenzy so tainted his case that the United States Supreme Court released him and ordered a retrial in the decision Sheppard v. Maxwell. At the 1966 retrial, Sheppard was acquitted. He died just a few years later.

In 1999, Sam and Marilyn’s son, Sam Reese Sheppard, unsuccessfully sued the state of Ohio for the wrongful imprisonment of his father. The documents collected and used by the prosecutor’s office in this trial are the basis of the collection.

The Sam Sheppard case materials were donated to the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law Library by the Cuyahoga County Prosecutor’s Office.

Updated Ohio Constitution Guide

Source: https://www.archives.gov/legislative/features/ohio-statehood/

Source:https://www.archives.gov/legislative/features/ohio-statehood/

Looking for information on the Ohio Constitution and current constitutional issues? Check out the Ohio Constitution – Law and History Guide, which has recently been updated. This research guide includes references to primary and secondary sources, information on Ohio’s previous constitutions and conventions, tables tracking proposed amendments, suggested resources by topic, and more.

The Court Decisions tab features brief summaries of Ohio Supreme Court opinions weighing in on constitutional law issues, now including very recent 2016 opinions. The research guide also features information on pending cases, and links to the Supreme Court’s docket and video recordings of oral arguments.

A new table was just added to track Proposed Bills and Resolutions that amend the Constitution and are currently before the Ohio Legislature. If you are looking for proposed amendments decided by Ohio voters, those can still be found under the Table of Proposed Amendments and Votes.

Another source for current constitutional issues is the Ohio Constitution News blog, operated in conjunction with the research guide.

Keep in mind that proposed amendments and constitutional revisions can be good fodder for upper level research papers.

2015 Morris Cohen Essay Competition

Photograph of Morris Cohen.C|M|Law students, are you writing a paper with an historical analysis?  Consider submitting your paper to the Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Competition, conducted by the  Legal History and Rare Books Special Interest Section (LHRB SIS) of the American Association of law Libraries (AALL), in cooperation with Gale Learning and Research Solutions, Cengage Learning.  Full- and part-time students currently enrolled in accredited graduate programs in law, history, library science or related fields are eligible to enter.  Essays may be on any topic related to legal history, rare law books, or legal archives.  The winner will receive a $500 prize from Cengage Learning and up to $1,000 for costs of attending the 2015 AALL Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, as well as the opportunity to present the winning essay at the AALL Annual Meeting and submit it to Law Library Journal, the official journal of the AALL.  The Competition electronic submission deadline is 11:59pm, Monday, 16 March 2015.

Full Competition details and Application Form are available at the LHRB SIS Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Competition Web page.  Questions can be sent to Marguerite Most (most@law.duke.edu), Reference Librarian and Senior Lecturing Fellow, Duke University School of Law Goodson Law Library, or Timothy G. Kearley (TKearley@uwyo.edu), Professor Emeritus of Law, University of Wyoming College of Law.

The Competition is named for Morris L. Cohen, who was Professor Emeritus of Law at Yale Law School and recognized as “one of the towering figures of late 20th century law libraries.”  His scholarly work  focused on legal research, rare books, and historical bibliography.