News and information useful to Cleveland-Marshall College of Law students, faculty and staff.

Archive for the ‘Law Student News’

ModioLegal: Listen to Law Related Articles on Your Phone

ModioLegal is a service that partners with legal publishers to convert news and current-awareness content to audio that subscribers can access through their phones. The articles are read word-for-word and delivered to users on the same day or next day after the article would have been received in print or in text online. ModioLegal uses human narrators: law students who are familiar with the subject matter.

The following publications are available on ModioLegal:

  • The Tax Lawyer (ABA)
  • ABI Journal (American Bankruptcy Institute)
  • Litigation in Practice (by Judge Curtis Karnow)

More titles will be added in the future.

C|M|Law students and staff have trial access until Summer 2018. To sign up for free access today:

  • Go to
  • Click the Law School Portal button (right side of screen)
  • Enter the requested information
  • Login credential and instructions will be sent via email

Tips to Beat Anxiety in Law School

Everyone experiences anxiety from time to time. And it’s certainly normal to experience occasional anxiety in law school with being called on for class, taking exams, or doing any type of public speaking. But people with an anxiety disorder face feelings of worry or fear that can completely disrupt their school, work, or family life. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, there are three kinds of anxiety disorders: generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder. Treatments include talk therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, self-help or support groups, stress management techniques, or medication. The CSU Counseling Center or another mental health care provider can help diagnose and treat anxiety disorders.

There are plenty of tips to alleviate anxiety – (for example here, here and here), and these ideas can probably be used to help with garden-variety anxiety as well as the more debilitating kind. Here are some things to consider now:

  • If you’re in law school, you might be a perfectionist — a regular type-A personality. If that’s the case, try relaxing some of your rigidly high expectations for yourself, and celebrate the successes you’ve had so far in your law school career and in your life in general.
  • Again, if you’re in law school, you might be particularly risk-adverse. This is certainly a common trait among lawyers. If so, try doing something adventurous once a week. This might help you feel more comfortable with uncertainty and with not being in total control of everything around you.
  • As hard as it might sound at times, limit alcohol and caffeine – both have been shown to aggravate anxiety or cause panic attacks.
  • Even when law school seems to keep piling things on your plate, take time to get a little exercise each day and a good night’s sleep. Sometimes this alone is enough to knock out stress and anxiety.

It Happens to Law Students and Lawyers Too: Depression Facts and Resources

Having a rough day at law school can leave anyone feeling blue. But for people who have clinically diagnosed depression, low moods are long-lasting and more severe, and are often coupled with other symptoms like lack of energy or focus, feeling worthless, or irritability. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA),

  • There are several different types of depression, including major depressive disorder, which affects around 16.1 million adults in the U.S.
  • Women are more likely than men to experience depression.
  • Depression and anxiety disorders are not the same, but the symptoms can be similar. It’s not uncommon for people to suffer from both depression and anxiety.

Not surprisingly, the legal profession is not immune to depression. A 2016 study published in the Journal of Addiction Medicine showed that approximately 28% of lawyers struggle with some form of depression. In a 2016 Survey of Law Student Well-Being, 17% of law students experienced depression, and one-sixth of the survey participants were diagnosed with depression since starting law school.

If you suspect that you or a law student you know is experiencing depression, there is help on campus and in the community. The CSU Counseling Center offers depression screenings in October and March each year. But you don’t have to wait until one of the screening events to get help. The Counseling Center offers individual programs on overcoming depression that you access anytime. Various organizations and support groups are available in the Cleveland area to help with depression.

It’s smart to recognize the difference between feeling down and being clinically depressed. You can educate yourself and get help if you or a friend needs it.

Help for Law Students with Substance Abuse Problems

As a law student, you’re probably all too aware that the stress of law school can lead to mental health issues like depression, anxiety, even suicide. One of the major risk factors of mental health disorders is substance abuse. According to the ABA Substance Abuse & Mental Health Toolkit, the substance most frequently abused by law students is alcohol, with prescription drug abuse also on the rise.

A 2014 Survey of Law Student Well Being reported that

  • 43% of law students reported binge drinking at least once in the last two weeks
  • 22% reported binge drinking two or more times in the prior two weeks
  • Over 14% reported the use of some prescription drug without a prescription in the prior year.

Help is available for alcohol and drug abuse problems on campus through the CSU Counseling Center. Another service that you might not realize is an option for you is OLAP, the Ohio Lawyers Assistance Program. OLAP doesn’t just help lawyers and judges – their services are available to law students, too. OLAP can work to diagnose a substance abuse problem, offer recommendations, interventions, monitoring and support, and support for concerned family and friends.  OLAP also offers a self-test that runs you through some of the “tell-tale signs” of alcohol and drug abuse.

GavelNote Available for Free for C|M|Law Students

There is a new online note-taking platform called GavelNote, which was created specifically for law students (by Cleveland-Marshall graduates) to eliminate the drudgery of outlining your courses.

Capturing, compiling, and organizing class notes, case briefs, statutes, and black letter law into a useful outline is a very time-consuming process. GavelNote offers a way to automate that process, eliminating busywork and freeing up more time for actual studying. Sharing notes is easy with GavelNote’s sophisticated sharing feature that lets you decide what to share and who to share it with. Plus GavelNote stores your notes safely in the cloud. For more information about the benefits of GavelNote, visit:

Trying GavelNote is risk-free. If you don’t like GavelNote, simply export your notes and outlines into Microsoft Word format any time. As a current student, you can have with unlimited use of GavelNote throughout your law school career. Register now for your own personal account at: