News and information useful to Cleveland-Marshall College of Law students, faculty and staff.

Archive for the ‘Health law’

Bloomberg BNA’s Health Law Related Databases

Bloomberg BNA (link to our law databases list) has a number of health and health care related databases (among many others) to be aware of.  The following are all great resources for current awareness health law related information:

DHHS Cuts In-Person Advisory Committee Meetings

DHHS LogoThe U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has cut back on in-person meetings of Advisory Committees under the purview of the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH).  “To promote cost-effectiveness and efficiencies,” Advisory Committees are “to ensure that at least half of their committee meetings and all of their subcommittee meetings [are] conducted virtually.”  In-person Advisory Committee meetings are open to the public, and time is allotted for public comment.  Virtual meetings will mean Advisory Committee deliberations will not be public, and likely make robust discussion more difficult.  This change comes at an important time.  The Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections (SACHRP) is currently working on implementation of significant revisions to regulations concerning human research subjects – the Common Rule (45 C.F.R. 46).  SACHRP met in-person March 13-14, 2018, but is currently required to meet virtually on July 10, 2018 and Ocotber 16, 2018.

Dietary Supplement Label Database

The National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements and National Library of Medicine (NLM) have a Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD), which “contains the full label contents from a sample of dietary supplement products” currently marketed or discontinued in the U.S. Initially developed for scientists, this database, which covers about 17,000 supplements, will also be helpful to public health personnel and healthcare providers. DSLD data include contents and added ingredients from the supplement’s required Supplement Facts panel, along with directions for use, health-related claims, and cautions from the supplement’s label. The database provides Reference Links, Quick and Advanced searching, as well as alphabetical lists of ingredients, products, and contacts (i.e., manufacturer/distributor). DSLD files can be downloaded for use in Excel and several statistical packages (e.g., SPSS). For additional information, see the NLM DSLD Fact Sheet or the DSLD FAQ.

Live & Online Law Library Legal Research Seminars

This Spring 2018 semester, the Law Library is conducting two live Legal Research Seminars for C|M|Law students.  We are also offering many Seminars online, via the Westlaw TWEN platform, for students to complete at their convenience.  Remember, your Seminar points are good for the entire time you are here at C|M|Law.  When you earn 100 Seminar points, you receive a Legal Research Letter of Recognition & Digital Badge, for posting to your LinkedIn page.  Students can earn multiple Letters & Digital Badges.

The two live Legal Research Seminars will take place 4:50pm-5:50pm in Law Library Room A059.  Both are a must see if you plan to be working this summer!

  • Ohio Legal Research “Crash Course” – Thursday, March 29th – We’ll examine key Ohio research resources, as well as discuss effective strategies & best practices for their use. (25 points)
  • Getting Ready to Clerk – Thursday, April 5th – Legal practitioners will discuss research projects done by clerks & new associates – how projects are assigned, typical projects, and feedback to expect. (25 points)

The online Legal Research Seminars are available via the Westlaw TWEN platform:

  • Starting Research with Secondary Sources – Why recreate the wheel? Examine how secondary sources explain and analyze “the law,” as well as cite primary authority.
  • Terms & Connectors Searching – Explore the power of search techniques beyond natural language searching. Understand the basics of combining terms & phrases in effective search statements.
  • Westlaw Overview (and) Lexis Advance Overview – Leap beyond Google and start to harness these two legal research giants. Learn big box & pre-filtered searching, as well as how to print/download/email search results.
  • Shepard’s (and) KeyCite – Why is a red stop sign different from a yellow flag, and what should you do when you see either one? Examine reports in Shepard’s & KeyCite, and discover the power of these legal citator services.
  • Bluebooking – You and The Bluebook can be friends. For faster legal drafting, review how to effectively apply citation & style rules, and abbreviation & jurisdiction tables.
  • Bioethics Resources & Scholarly Writing – Examine a wide array of bioethics resources, and learn how these resources can be used to select a paper topic and conduct effective research on that topic.

Additional online Seminars will be added during the Spring 2018 semester.  You earn points for an online Seminar by correctly answering 3/4 of the questions on that Seminar‘s quiz.  Points vary per online Seminar.  [You cannot earn points for attending the same Seminar topic twice.]

Law Library Legal Research Seminars are for C|M|Law students, including our MLS and LLM students.  For additional information, contact Laura Ray, Outreach & Instructional Services Librarian, 216-687-6880,

Protection of Human Subjects “Common Rule” Revision Delayed

The revision of the U.S. Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects – the Common Rule – scheduled to become effective on 1/19/18, has been delayed by an interim final rule (see 83 Fed. Reg. 2885).  The effective date is now 7/19/18, but that date may be furthered delayed.  The Common Rule had been revised in a 2017 final rule, referred to as the “2018 Requirements” (see 82 Fed. Reg. 7149, 1/19/17, and 82 Fed. Reg. 43459, 9/18/17).  The Common Rule (see 45 C.F.R. 46) covers policy at 17 federal agencies, and those agencies “are in the process of developing a proposed rule to further delay implementation of the 2018 Requirements.”  Research and industry leaders believe the delay(s) will allow time for the DHHS Office for Human Research Protections to develop and provide guidance for implementation.